Hooking in?

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waterman2012
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Hooking in?

Postby waterman2012 » Sat Aug 01, 2015 11:07 pm

I realized my last two sessions I need serious tips and guidance regarding hooking in with the harness.
It has been one of my goals this year but i'm having difficulty. I have read up on length of the lines, played around with boom height etc. I think today i had my boom too high intially so lowered it. Was better but still not right(because i wasn't doing something right) Ended up forgetting about it and had fun but my arms are pretty exhausted. Anyone have general rules of thumb or good resources i can check out to help with this? Ill shoot for the conservation area next time so i can tips from from someone there.
HELP ME PLEASE.

slammed33
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Re: Hooking in?

Postby slammed33 » Sun Aug 02, 2015 7:44 am

I'd check out this video from Sam Ross
https://youtu.be/C5ik-yWu6tQ
Make sure that your rig is balanced and your harness lines are in the right spot. If your harness lines are to far back then your sail is always going to want to pull you forward. You should also practice getting in and out of the harness quickly in case you get yourself into trouble. While sub planing you should be able to get into the harness and work on board and sail control. Work on being a counter balance to your sail. Once your comfortable bare off a little and work the board up to a plane. Eventually work your way back to your foot straps. Getting your foot into your front foot strap at this point will offer you an anchor to keep you from getting catapulted. Most importantly don't force it, let the wind do the work for you. The sooner you learn to use your harness the more epic your sailing experiences will become.

MarekBad
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Re: Hooking in?

Postby MarekBad » Sun Aug 02, 2015 11:35 am

Very true words above.. The sooner you learn how to transfer you weight to the sail via harness, the more you'll like this sport - and will be able to keep sailing for hours, potentially. It made a world of a difference to me, at least.. My advice is to "hang" down and out as much as possible, let the boom carry all of your weight, it can handle it all no worries. When your feet get light and the board starts planing, you will know you are hanging in it enough.. It's a gradual process, so keep trying.

One more suggestion: it a sudden gust overpowers you to the other side while hooked in, do not let the boom go, hang on to it until sail touches flat on the water, yes you are falling onto your sail but having boom in hands allows you to roll to the side and into clear water, and not into the sail panels (costly to repair)

Marek

waterman2012
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Re: Hooking in?

Postby waterman2012 » Sun Aug 02, 2015 3:11 pm

Thanks very much. A lot of helpful information. Some of what you describe I've already experienced (I've fallen onto the sail...saw dollar signs but luckily there was no damage). Seem to be throwing myself off balancing when trying to hook in and navigate big rollers. Board tends to pitch with the waves before I've sunk my hips and I get thrown. Maybe hook in fast between waves? I'm going to continue to research and try the stuff you guys mentioned. Thanks again.

jroy1111
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Re: Hooking in?

Postby jroy1111 » Sun Aug 02, 2015 11:00 pm

Make sure you bring the sail to your harness hook, not the hook to the sail. Bringing the hook to the sail tends to make you go on your toes and this unbalances the board and makes the complete rig unstable. Always make sure your knees are a little bend, so you have some where go when a gust hits. Also if your knees are bent this also allows you to squat slightly in a gust until it passes.If you squat and something goes wrong then you have a better chance to fall back and not get thrown over the handle bars.

waterman2012
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Re: Hooking in?

Postby waterman2012 » Mon Aug 03, 2015 12:51 am

Awesome. Thanks. You're describing my exact problem. Pulling the hook to the sail rather than vice versa . I felt myself on my toes and knew it was throwing things off. Can't wait to get out and try this out . Thanks so much!

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JayTurcot
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Re: Hooking in?

Postby JayTurcot » Wed Aug 05, 2015 1:46 pm

Another comment on boom height.

As you get more advanced at windsurfing & pick up speed (planing) a few things happen:
(1) you tend to move a bit further back on the board (tiling the mast towards the tail)
(2) you move a bit more outboard (towards the rails), which tilts the mast a little outboard
(3) you sheet the sail in more

An exaggerated version is this kid:
Image

What that means is that when you're not planing moving / sheeted in, the harness lines will seem really high, only to later feel really comfortable once you're at speed / sheeted in.

Another example to look at: Formula windsurf boards are really wide with big sails, so they usually set the boom height at their nose height (really tall) but it lowers comfortably to a balanced position when they are planing.

I have very long lines (30") and one of the perks is that when I'm not planing, it's still easy to hook in / out and even move the rig around. Because I've been doing this for a while I don't have trouble keeping my weight in the harness lines for such long lines (symptom: bouncing makes the harness lines unhook).

Keep at it and you'll get more comfortable, and know that what you're going through is a normal part of learning. Just hook in and out lots, the muscle memory will come.
For me & my normal boom height I feel a bit awkward hooked in when not planing, you get used to it quickly though!
Jay Turcot
"It's a crazy addiction we have isn't it?"

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Jonathan
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Re: Hooking in?

Postby Jonathan » Thu Aug 06, 2015 9:36 am

JayTurcot wrote: I have very long lines (30") and one of the perks is that when I'm not planing, it's still easy to hook in / out and even move the rig around. Because I've been doing this for a while I don't have trouble keeping my weight in the harness lines for such long lines (symptom: bouncing makes the harness lines unhook).
^^This. I switched from 24" lines to 28" lines and it changed my windsurfing completely. It allows me to hook-in in light winds as Jay said, but also the ability to really sink deep into the harness/lines when overpowered. I never fear catapulting any more. If I do feel like I'm going to get catapulted and I don't have time to sink into the harness (caught standing straight up or in a bad position) I pull in with the front arm and it de-powers the sail. This has saved me countless times while planing or not planing.

Just curious how long your lines are? Also, are you using a seat or waist harness? I started with a seat harness and found it hard to get into the lines. Switched to a waist and it was much easier.
"The wind is about to be a very important part of your life..."
- Jem Hall

waterman2012
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Re: Hooking in?

Postby waterman2012 » Thu Aug 06, 2015 7:13 pm

Excellent! Thanks for all the tips. I will study these over prior to the next time I go out. Maybe ill practice on land some to get an idea of line lengths etc before heading out.
I'm using a waist harness and have never used a seat harness. I set my lines according to what someone told me - reaches my elbow when I grasp the boom , the ends being roughly a palmswidth apart on the boom. My stuff is in Long Beach right now so I can't measure exactly. I think putting into practice some of your guys suggestions will make a big difference as you described exactly the problems I was having. Thanks again, can't wait to get out again.

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drewb70
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Re: Hooking in?

Postby drewb70 » Thu Aug 06, 2015 9:22 pm

Adjustable lines have really helped me. It is nice to shorten them on marginal days and lengthen when its nuken. Mind you my adjustments are far more subtle than the used to be. Keep try to hook in. As soon as u do it will be a major shift in your fun factor.

andyz
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Re: Hooking in?

Postby andyz » Fri Aug 07, 2015 8:49 am

Visit LB trailer park on any windy day (SW) and there will be frequenters windsurfers who would be glad to help and coach you.


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